Heading to Vegas? A list of the best buffets…

Yeah, this is a wee bit off my usual topics here on the Business Blog @ Intuitive.com, but since I find myself in Las Vegas 2-3 times each year and since I’m heading there in just a few weeks to co-host an executive workshop (shhh! details to come), followed immediately by speaking at Blogworld and New Media Expo [aff], I paid attention when hotel review site Oyster‘s PR team sent out a list of its top buffet options in Vegas.
Without further ado (muchly because I haven’t been to most of them!) here’s their list:

Best Vegas Buffets, 2009-2010

  1. bellagio buffet
    The fabulous Bellagio Buffet

    Bellagio — Centrally located on the Las Vegas Strip, Bellagio’s buffet is widely considered to be the very best. Its carving station goes beyond the usual prime rib to include St. Louis barbecue ribs and chicken Wellington. The large variety of cuisines includes Italian, Japanese, Chinese seafood, and American. It’s not the cheapest — $14.95 breakfasts, $19.95 lunches, $23.95 weekend brunches, $27.95 weeknight dinners, and $35.95 dinner Saturdays and Sundays, when the buffet includes Kobe beef — but it’s worth it.

  2. M Resort Spa & Casino — Studio B, the buffet at the newly opened M Resort, serves upwards of 200 dishes a day. At lunch and dinner, the buffet even includes free beer and wine — perhaps as incentive to lure diners to the hotel’s location, 10 miles from the Strip. In terms of quality, the food is on par with other top Vegas buffets, including the highly touted one at the Bellagio, but the prices are lower (breakfast is $11, compared with $14.95 at Bellagio, for example).
  3. Rio All Suites Hotel & Casino — The remarkable all-you-can-eat Village Seafood buffet at the Rio is well worth the short trip from the Strip. Serving snow crab legs, Cuban shrimp stew, Baja fish tacos, mussels, and fresh-shucked oysters (all flown in daily), the buffet bests the 300-plus mediocre dishes at the hotel’s Carnival World buffet. A new sound and light system in the dining room accompanies videos about ocean species, fishing, and the culinary arts. At $38, it’s pricey, so swing by the lobster station to get your money’s worth. (This one I’ve been to, actually, and I’d agree that it’s a lot of variety, but the quality of each individual dish is nothing to write home about. A good place to get stuffed on a wide variety of food, tho.)
  4. Wynn Las Vegas — The buffet at the Wynn, the ”Las Vegas Review-Journal’s staff pick for best buffet in Las Vegas in 2009, is on the high end of Vegas buffets ($34.95 weeknight dinners). But for that price, diners get 16 staffed cooking stations, including ones serving seafood, Italian, Mexican, and American cuisine, and an impressive dessert spread. Plus, in contrast to most Vegas buffets, the grand dining room is large and airy.
  5. Paris Las Vegas — The whimsical, Disney-esque Le Village Buffet at the Paris — voted best buffet by the Las Vegas Review-Journal three years in a row — has five cook-to-order stations, each serving a different regional French cuisine. Lines can be long, and the gooey pie filling on top of the Belgian waffles is no substitute for real fruit, but Francophile diners with American appetites won’t find such a vast spread of French food at a better price ($15 breakfasts, $25 dinners). (Actually, I’ve been here too and it was good. Less choice, but better food, and the decor in Paris is nicely done too.)
  6. Flamingo Las Vegas — Unlike most Vegas buffets, which tend to be dark and windowless, the scenic Flamingo Paradise Garden Buffet overlooks the streams, gardens, and live flamingos of the hotel’s wildlife preserve. For food, your best bet is the $20 champagne brunch: some 60 different breakfast foods, including made-to-order omelets and waffles, corned beef hash, and smoked Norwegian salmon. The $22 dinners, however, are no better than average (except for the crustacean corner).
  7. Treasure Island — The Treasure Island buffet is not the biggest on the Strip, but with a chef who makes salads to order, a custom pasta station, sushi chefs on the floor, and barbecue, it’s definitely a notch above the typical Vegas all-you-can-eat spread, and all for a reasonable price ($14-$22 breakfasts, $22-$26 dinners). Plus, the food is fresh and the servers are attentive.

Next time I’m in Vegas, I think I’ll try the Bellagio. Who’s in?
To pay the piper, here’s a blurb on Oyster Hotel Reviews too:

Oyster Hotel Reviews is the only source — on or off the web — for the world’s most comprehensive, independent, professional hotel reviews. With cameras in hand, their reporters visit each hotel anonymously, and assess it on more than 70 different measures — everything from best hotel restaurants to the best hotels for celeb sightings. The site offers more than 50,000 photos and covers 100s of hotels. Compare the exaggerations and distortions of the hotels’ own Web sites with Oyster’s honest reporting and photos, and you’ll never stay anywhere without an Oyster reality-check.

Bellagio buffet image from nmgastronome.com.

4 comments on “Heading to Vegas? A list of the best buffets…

  1. Those are some good choices there. I personally didn’t care too much for the Paris or Flamingo buffets. My favorites would include:
    Carnival World Buffet – Rio
    Spice Market Buffet – Planet Hollywood
    Dishes – Treasure Island
    The Buffet at Wynn
    The Feast Buffet at Red Rock Station
    Although I lived in Las Vegas for several years, I never made it to the Bellagio buffet or the newer M Resort buffet. I’ve heard good things about both. Overall, plenty of great buffets in Las Vegas. I just wish the prices were more reasonable.

  2. My favourites have been Wynn (the quality of choises) and Studio B (the atmosphere on relatively quiet night) plus my first Vegas experience five years ago – which I don’t remember the name (it was a smaller casino on the other side of the highway but with a lots and lots of people waiting for the buffet).
    Treasure Island I have not tried yet but maybe I should as I read the book not so long time ago 🙂

  3. The Treasure Island buffet is not the biggest on the Strip, but with a chef who makes salads to order, a custom pasta station, sushi chefs on the floor, and barbecue, it’s definitely a notch above the typical Vegas all-you-can-eat spread, and all for a reasonable price ($14-$22 breakfasts, $22-$26 dinners). Plus, the food is fresh and the servers are attentive.

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